Nigerian Actress Pepi Sonuga BLAST African Americans . . . For Making 'MIXED' Africans Like Her . . . 'Feel Out Of Place'!! (How Is She 'MIXED' When Both Her Parents Are BLACK??)

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A Nigerian-American actress Pepi Sonuga, who lives in Los Angeles, is making news - for making what many feel are derogatory comments about African Americans. Pepi, who refers to herself as "mixed" because her parents are from two different Nigerian tribes - Igbo and Yoruba, claims that African Americans don't treat "mixed race" people well.

Here's what she told Yahoo News:

In Nigeria, there is a long deep-rooted history of tribalism. So my parents being from two different tribes gave me an understanding and tolerance for people ‘on the outside,’ but also left me out a lot of times unable to truly categorize what side I belonged to.

Then when I came to America, I still didn’t fit in because there are on going prejudices within the African and African American community. AAs tend to view Africans as ‘the other.’ As a young child, this obviously confused and upset me because I didn’t understand why I wasn’t being accepted by people who looked just like me. . .

I feel like I never fit it in, in my life. It’s not like I was super popular back home. Mixed-race people, you wouldn’t think that’s a struggle, but they don’t fit in anywhere. It’s not a cool feeling to feel left out.

Here's her bio from IMDB:

Pepi Sonuga is a Nigerian-American actress born in Lagos to a family of African and English descent. She moved to Los Angeles, California at the age of 11 and began pursuing a career in entertainment. At 15 years old, she won the title of Miss Teen Los Angeles in a local pageant and then began modeling for brands such as Hot Topic, Sprit Hoods, Forever 21, Skechers and many more. She attended Culver City High School and began studying theater arts, improvisation, and script writing in a drama class. She will appear in the feature film Life of a King, which is set to debut in 2013, making that her first theatrical role.